January’s favourites: 5 cheer-myself-up foods and drinks

Time, whatever happens it passes and doesn’t care if you’re late, you can call it bastard, but in the meantime it’s gone already.” says my rough translations of a song from the famous Italian songwriter Lorenzo Jovanotti. Time flies, it ridiculously does, and while I’m trying to figure out the important changes that are occurring in my life at moment, I suddenly find myself realising that an entire month is gone since my last post. It’s been stressful so far, considering everything is going on with my family, so keeping my 2015 resolution to stay positive has been likewise difficult, but I like to think I’m stronger than that, therefore fingers crossed because I don’t want to snap.

What I really like about myself, together with few other personal characteristics, is that my eating habits are not affected at all from the various everyday life circumstances. Even in the darkest of my days I never thought for one second to skip meals, because food is extremely important for me and if I don’t eat, neither my body nor my mood would cooperate to brighten the atmosphere.

During this month I kept myself up with these fabulous foods and drinks that I’d like to share with you guys. Who knows, if they worked for me they could do the same for you.

Almond milk. Ok it’s not technically milk, but more of a drink that resembles milk. Lately I’m having problems with regular English milk (yes, as weird as it sounds, the one I have in Italy is totally fine) so I thought giving almond milk a go, after I found out the soy one and I don’t really get along. I like the toasted flavour that matches my Illy coffee blend, but still, it’s not milk. That’s what, sometimes this January, has led me directly to point n.2.

Credits: Michael Kwan

Matcha latte. The Japanese famous bitter green tea powder exceptionally  combined with warm frothy milk by the skilful Timberyard baristas. A comforting treat which takes me back to the friendly atmosphere of Tokyo’s cafés.

Fresh mango with full fat greek yogurt and desiccated coconut. Ok this breakfast/afternoon snack came up by throwing in a bowl some stuff I had in the fridge, together with that desiccated coconut that was sitting in my pantry for too long. Thick rich yogurt for the creamy texture, coconut adds crunch and mango for a tropical sweet touch.

Talking about ‘Nduja here.

‘Nduja. The Calabrian spreadable spicy salami you can enjoy on your bruschetta or to revive your pasta sauce, or even better, you can melt it on your pizza to give that fiery Southern Italy kick. I also use to add it to soups, because it completely enhances the overall flavour.

IMG_1691

My last visit at Tonkotsu East.

Tsukemen: it was love at first bite when the waitress at Rokurinsha, Tokyo, brought me a big bowl of these thick noodles to dip in their rich pork broth. I never had the chance to eat them since that moment, almost three years ago. However London is always full of wonders, so when I found out that Tonkotsu East was serving tsukemen I had no choice but go trying them. What a joy it was! Perfect homemade noodles with the right porous texture that allows to absorb the broth. I won’t disclose any more details guys, as I’m preparing a review with an another article about my personal ranking of ramen bars in London.

So these are my January’s favourite foods and drinks, but I’m always looking for something new to cheer myself up with, so I can’t wait to hear about your suggestions.

Let me know, guys!

Does colour influence the taste and flavour perception of food?

Last Saturday I found myself staring at my partner’s cheeseburger questioning his choice of cheese: Red Leicester.

Red Leicester cheese @Neal’s Yard Dairy. The one in the burger was unnaturally brighter.

Last Saturday I found myself staring at my partner’s cheeseburger questioning his choice of cheese: Red Leicester. I had never tried it before last week, because that bright orange colour sincerely put me off every time I considered buying that cheese. The fact that it’s coloured with annatto, a natural extract of the Archiote tree’s fruit, still doesn’t convince me entirely. I’m not sure why, maybe it’s just an irrational instinct, but that colour in a cheese still feels unnatural to me. Never judge a book by its cover, right? So even though I had preconceived ideas, this was the right time to finally have a bite of that intensely bright orange cheese and prove myself I was just having unreasonable biases. A little bite full of expectations, I would say, but then a sense of confusion mixed with disappointment hit me hard: Red Leicester tasted just as regular Cheddar. (Forgive me, cheese purists!) Why was I experiencing that negative feeling? I kept wondering, until I suddenly got the answer: my brain and eyes just fooled me. Even though being surprised and, at the same time, fascinated by this phenomenon, I rationally tried to give myself an acceptable explanation: my brain did an association with a familiar cheese based on that bright colour. Red Leicester should have tasted nutty and sharp, just like my beloved Molisan Provolone Cheese when is aged for a couple of year and gets a warm golden shade. It’s not news that food companies add colourings to their products in order to alter their appearance, making them look fresher and more appealing for customers. It’s an effective technique that bears its fruits because we always “eat with our eyes” first. We start making choices about favourite colours since childhood and try to apply them to various aspects of our daily life. Neuroscientists claim that this is due to an early association of a positive feedback to a certain colour, so during our life we tend to recreate that comforting feeling by choosing the same colour, which often becomes our favourite one. Kids love coloured food because they can associate an exact colour with their favourite toy, or cartoon character. For example, It’s not rare, during the Italian summer, to witness children happily devouring a “Smurf  gelato”, which is nothing other than a blued dyed vanilla ice cream. Less happily their mothers will struggle to remove those stubborn blue stains from clothes, but this is another story. Anyway, sorry mum!

Gelato Puffo or Smurf Ice cream. @foodspotting

We are the same children, who grow up and change their eating habits for healthier and “more natural” options. We learn the importance of colour in foods as an essential characteristic to judge the freshness of a product, for example we experience the consequences of eating a steak that turned green, and painfully regret we didn’t toss it. Literally. In the meantime, the society we live in has shaped a stable idea about the food we eat, its wide range of colours and the flavour we associate with each one of those shades. In other words we develop a precise idea of what a certain food should taste like based on its appearance in our own cultural context. This is why we are confused, and at times disappointed, when this matching does not happen. Now, try to picture a young woman being tricked by her friends into drinking what looked like a blood orange smoothie. Then imagine her wide-eyed expression when, in a fraction of a second, her tastebuds rapidly experienced the strong sour and salty flavour of Gazpacho.  Yes, that woman shouting at her friends was me.

Yellow watermelon on hungryforchange.tv

Sometimes it can also be fun to see our cultural certainties crumble, like the first time I tried the yellow watermelon. I was visiting a nice Japanese lady in Tokyo, when she brought a beautiful blue ceramic plate with some precisely cut slices of yellow watermelon. Yellow? Thank God, she “couldn’t read my poker face”, but I was seriously puzzled inside. “That melon would have been sour, like every unripe fruit.” My stream of consciousness kept flowing in the few seconds necessary to thank my host and take a slice. A first bite and within a moment I felt so stupid! Because it was even sweeter than the common watermelon I crave every summer. I am sure that without this experience I would have never bought that fruit because of a preconceived idea. The mental association between the colour of a food and the assumption we have about its taste is a field that neuroscientists are still exploring, but recent experiments have revealed some remarkably interesting results. For example, an experiment conducted by the Ohio State University showed how using a red colouring in white wine led the unaware participants to describe the aroma and the flavour of the drink with adjectives belonging to the semantic field of red wine. Colours influence our daily life and even the choice of the food we eat. I am fascinated by the way our brain works, leading us to pick a specific coloured food over another simply because it gives us pleasure. However sometimes the same brain tricks itself and that’s when a new memorable colour related experience is created, whether it is positive or negative. What do you guys think about the influence of colours in the choice of our food? Please let me know in a comment below.

Best Gelato in London: Gelupo vs La Gelatiera

Here’s the situation: I’m stuck at home because of heavy rain (Thanks, Hurricane Bertha) and I’m staring at my empty fridge, hoping that something would magically pop up out of nowhere.

The sound of rain, which is usually relaxing for me, now carries a sad message: Summer is officially over. In other words, for many, ice cream season has come to an end, but not for me. Well, to be honest, I’d rather go for gelato instead of ice cream, but unfortunately it’s difficult to find it as good as the Italian one.

For those of you who are wondering, no, gelato is not just a mere translation of ice cream. We are talking about a different product with a softer and lighter texture than ice cream. This is due to the higher percentage of milk rather than cream and the slower churning process (Look here for technicalities)

Luckily enough, London has everything you can think of, so all I had to do was some research about the best gelato in town and of course, I had to “sacrifice” myself by trying it for you guys.

Gelupo: I’ve been there twice and I was lucky enough to try one of the best gelatos of my entire life. The first time I got licorice, but I was curious to try pistachio, because I judge a shop valid by the ability of producing a real pistachio gelato without food colourings or artificial flavours that I can immediately recognise. Pistachio was as it should always be, a natural light green to almost beige shade and a real taste of pistachio, which means nutty, almost salty. However, licorice was what impressed me the most: bitter and sweet, too strong for some, but definitely not for me, because I loved how this particular flavour and its aftertaste were perfectly combined with their creamy texture.

foto 3

licorice and pistachio @ Gelupo

I went back to Gelupo the week after and I tried ricotta and sour cherry and apricot and amaretto. Again the texture was creamy as it should be, but I found amaretto to be too much overpowering as I could not really taste the apricot. I’m fussy, I know, but let’s be realistic Gelupo’s product is amazing.

Gelupo, 7 Archer Street, London, W1D 7AU.

La Gelatiera – I’ve been there twice as well, as the first time I tried matcha and passion fruit but I went back because I had to try the more daring flavours that this place is also known for.

Gelatiera

Speaking about texture, La Gelatiera’s gelato is creamy and melts in your mouth, so it’s possible to taste the results of the research, the hard work and the time spent perfecting the product.

Passion fruit was so refreshing and well balanced, while matcha was not as I expected in terms of flavour, because I found it mild. In all fairness, I have to say that I am more used to the matcha gelato that I tried in Japan, where the product uses a more bitter green tea which is balanced with the sweetness of the cream. However I understand that a mild version is much more appreciated by a western palate.

foto 2

Matcha and Passion fruit @ La Gelatiera

The second time I felt sure enough to try some unusual flavour, so I chose honey and rosemary with orange zest. Quite impressing given that both rosemary and orange being very strong flavours contrasting with each other on a mild base, honey. As much as I liked to experiment, I believe an entire cone is too much though.

Again I’m a fussy customer and again the product is excellent.

La Gelatiera, 27 New Row, Covent Garden, London WC2N 4LA.

Between the two I choose…both! it’s a tie as they both do an amazing job in selecting their prime ingredients and their preparation techniques, and believe me, you can definitely taste the quality.

I would love some gelato right now, but I’m still here at home listening to the sound of heavy rain and wondering when it’ll stop.

 

And now in Italian.

La situazione è questa: sono bloccata a casa a causa della forte pioggia (Grazie, uragano Bertha) e sto fissando il mio frigo vuoto, sperando che qualcosa sbuchi magicamente dal nulla.

Il suono della pioggia, che di solito trovo molto rilassante, ora è portatore di un messaggio inesorabile: l’estate è ufficialmente finita. In altre parole, per molti, la stagione del gelato è giunta al termine, ma non per me.

Ad essere onesti, io preferisco il gelato italiano rispetto all’ice cream, ma purtroppo è difficile trovare un prodotto simile a quello a cui sono abituata.

Per quelli di voi che se lo stanno chiedendo, gelato e ice cream non sono solo la traduzione l’uno dell’altro. Quando parliamo di gelato (quindi quello italiano), intendiamo un prodotto diverso con una consistenza più morbida e più leggera rispetto all’ice cream, per merito di una maggiore percentuale di latte rispetto alla panna e ad un processo di mantecatura (sarà questo il termine corretto?) più lento. (Guardate qui per i dettagli tecnici.)

Fortunatamente, Londra ha tutto ciò che si possa immaginare, quindi tutto quello che dovevo fare era qualche ricerca sul miglior gelato in città e, naturalmente, mi sono “sacrificata” provandolo per voi.

Gelupo – sono stata due volte in questa gelateria e ho avuto la fortuna di provare uno dei migliori gelato di tutta la mia vita. La prima volta ho preso liquirizia e pistacchio, perché giudico la validità della gelateria dalla capacità di produrre un vero gelato al pistacchio, senza coloranti o aromi artificiali che sono facilmente riconoscibili. Questo gusto era come dovrebbe sempre essere in realtà, un verde chiaro e naturale quasi tendente al beige e un vero sapore di pistacchio, quasi salato. Comunque, il gusto liquirizia mi ha stupita di più: amaro e dolce, troppo forte per alcuni, ma sicuramente non per me. Ho apprezzato molto come questo particolare sapore e il suo retrogusto fossero perfettamente equilibrati con una consistenza cremosa.

Sono tornata da Gelupo la settimana dopo e ho provato ricotta variegata all’ amarena e albicocca e amaretto. Anche in questo caso la consistenza era cremosa come dovrebbe sempre essere, ma credo che l’amaretto fosse talmente forte da non poter sentire l’albicocca. Io sono molto esigente, lo so, ma sono anche realista, il gelato di Gelupo è ottimo.

Gelupo, 7 Archer Street, London, W1D 7AU.

 

La Gelatierasono stata anche qua due volte, la prima volta che ho provato tè verde matcha e frutto della passione, poi sono tornata perché volevo provare dei gusti più inusuali per i quali questa gelateria è famosa.

Parlando di consistenza, abbiamo un gelato cremoso e che si scioglie in bocca, quindi è possibile vedere e gustare i risultati della ricerca, il duro lavoro e il tempo impiegato a perfezionare il prodotto.

Il frutto della passione era rinfrescante e ben bilanciato, mentre il matcha non era come mi aspettavo in termini di sapore, perché l’ho ​​trovato leggero. In tutta onestà, devo dire che mi viene facile il paragone con il gelato matcha che ho provato in Giappone, dove si utilizza un tè verde più amaro che contrasta con la dolcezza della panna. Comunque capisco anche che una versione più leggera potrebbe essere più apprezzata da un palato occidentale.

La seconda volta volevo qualcosa di più inusuale, così ho scelto il gusto miele e rosmarino con scorza d’arancia. Molto buono, considerando che sia il rosmarino sia la scorza d’arancia sono ingredienti dai sapori molto forti ed in contrasto tra di loro su una base dolce, il miele. Per quanto mi piaccia sperimentare, credo che scegliere solo questo gusto sia troppo, perché dopo un po’ stufa.

Di nuovo, sono una cliente esigente magari anche un po’ pignola e, di nuovo, il prodotto è eccellente.

La Gelatiera, 27 New Row, Covent Garden, London WC2N 4LA.

 

Tra i due scelgo … entrambi! si tratta di un pareggio in quanto entrambi fanno un ottimo lavoro nella scelta dei loro ingredienti di prima scelta e delle loro tecniche di preparazione. Credetemi, si può sentire che il prodotto che ne viene fuori è di altissima qualità.

Mi piacerebbe del gelato in questo momento, ma sono ancora qui a casa, sento il suono della pioggia e mi chiedo quando smetterà.

July’s favourites: 5 London’s independent coffee shops that I love

Monmouth Coffee @Borough Market during my last visit. Coffee blend is Gichatha-ini from Kenya.

Flat White @ Monmouth. The blend is Gichatha-ini from Kenya.

My day doesn’t start until I get my cup of coffee. Not just because it wakes me up more quickly, but just because it’s a comforting habit, that takes different forms according to the context: from my Dad’s strong espresso back in Italy, to my much bigger paper cup and different blends in the UK or when I’m lucky enough to travel around the world.

I admit that in the first place coffee abroad meant to me the famous green siren logo, but there definitely was something else out there to try, and I had to try it. Needless to say that after the first independent coffee, it’s impossible to go back.

I always like to try a different one and these are my 4 favourite coffee shops that I discovered this month in London, plus my all time favourite that I always go back to.

Nude Espresso – This coffee shop has its own roastery where the staff takes good care of their coffee beans from the start, when they are still green. The House Blend has, according to my taste buds, a taste of licorice with a softer aftertaste, medium body and low acidity. Just to clarify, I’m not an expert, just a person who really loves coffee.

Nude Espresso, 26 Hanbury Street, London, E1 6QR (their roastery is just opposite the coffee shop and it’s open to public from Wednesday to Sunday)

 

Prufrock – Nice and cool atmosphere just as their informed and helpful staff. The House blend is light and sweet as it delicately cuddles you while waking you up in the morning.

Prufrock Coffee, 23-25 Leather Lane, London, EC1N 7TE.

 

Allpress Espresso – directly from New Zealand, Allpress team knows how to treat coffee and to prepare an amazing flat white. Their House Blend is sweet with caramel notes and low acidity, which makes it the ideal partner for milk.

FW@allpress

Flat White @ Allpress

The staff is not only very helpful, but also smiling and relaxed, which also leads customers to peacefully enjoy their coffee break, or their superb breakfast!

Allpress Espresso, 58 Redchurch Street, Shoreditch, London, E2 7DP.

 

Kaffeine – Another Australian/New Zealand coffee shop that perfected the art of Coffee Making. Their House Blend is a balance of sweetness and acidity, perfect, again, with milk to achieve an excellent flat white. They are Australian afterall!

Kaffeine’s supplier is Square Mile, one of the most awarded roasteries in the world.

Kaffeine, 66 Great Titchfield St, London W1W 7QJ.

 

Monmouth – well if you say independent coffee, you say Monmouth. This is my favourite coffee shop, the one I always find myself going back to. The reason is simple: there is the possibility to try their different blends for any coffee drink, just ask the highly knowledgeable staff. They will advise you on the kind of blend is better for the drink of your choice and your personal tastes. Then they will grind the exact quantity they need for your coffee and within minutes you’ll have it there, ready for you to enjoy it.

My advice is the House Blend if you like a smooth and sweet taste that reminds of almonds and chocolate, but if you want to try something with more body and acidity, try the Brazilian Fazenda da Lagoa, amazing for espresso.

FW@Monmouth

Flat White @ Monmouth. Brazilian Blend Fazenda da Lagoa (sky blue label)

Monmouth, 27 Monmouth Street Covent Garden London WC2H 9EU

 

I hope you guys enjoy these coffee shops as much as I do, not only for their high quality ingredients but also for the expert staff who is willing to help the customers and share the good coffee culture. And no, they will not misspell your name on the paper cup, which for me is a big thumbs up.

 

And now in Italian.

La mia giornata non inizia finché non bevo il mio caffè. Non perché mi svegli più in fretta, ma perché è un’abitudine che mi rassicura, e che cambia secondo dove mi trovo: dall’espresso ristretto di mio padre in Italia, alla mia cup di carta e le diverse miscele qui in Inghilterra, o quando ho la fortuna di viaggiare per il mondo.

Ammetto che all’inizio, associavo il caffè al di fuori dei confini italiani al bicchierone di carta con il famoso logo della sirena verde, ma sapevo che c’era sicuramente qualcos’altro là fuori e dovevo provarlo. Inutile dire che, dopo il primo caffè indipendente non si torna più indietro.

Mi piace sempre provarne uno diverso e questi sono i miei 4 caffè preferiti che ho scoperto in questo mese in giro per Londra, più quello che amo da sempre e in cui torno spesso:

 

Nude Espresso – Questo caffè ha la propria torrefazione dove il personale si prende cura dei chicchi di caffè fin dall’inizio, quando sono ancora verdi.

La miscela della casa ha, secondo le mie papille gustative, un sapore di liquirizia, con un retrogusto più morbido, di corpo medio e bassa acidità. Comunque io non sono esperta del settore, ma solo una persona che ama veramente il caffè.

Nude Espresso, 26 Hanbury Street, London, E1 6QR (la torrefazione è proprio di fronte alla caffetteria ed è aperto al pubblico dal Mercoledì alla Domenica)

 

Prufrock Atmosfera piacevole e giovane, proprio come il loro personale, competente e disponibile. La miscela della casa è leggera e dolce come una coccola delicata che ti sveglia dolcemente.

Prufrock Coffee, 23-25 ​​Leather Lane, Londra, EC1N 7TE.

 

Allpress Espresso – Direttamente dalla Nuova Zelanda, la squadra di Allpress sa come trattare il caffè e preparare un flat white straordinario. La loro miscela della casa è dolce, con note di caramello e bassa acidità, che lo rende il partner ideale per il latte.

Il personale non solo è molto disponibile, ma anche sorridente e rilassato, il che permette anche ai clienti di godersi la pausa caffè in pace. Oppure la loro colazione, che è superlativa!

Allpress Espresso, 58 Redchurch Street, Shoreditch, Londra, E2 7DP.

 

Kaffeine – Un altro locale Australiano/Neo Zelandese che ha perfezionato l’arte del caffè. La loro miscela della casa è un equilibrio di dolcezza e acidità, perfetto, ancora una volta, con il latte per ottenere un ottimo flat white. Dopotutto, sono australian!

Il fornitore di Kaffeine è Square Mile, una delle torrefazioni più premiate al mondo.

Kaffeine, 66 Great Titchfield St, Londra W1W 7QJ.

 

Monmouth – Se dico caffè indipendente, penso subito a Monmouth. Questo è il mio caffè preferito, quello in cui torno sempre. Il motivo è semplice: c’è la possibilità di provare le loro diverse miscele per qualsiasi tipo di caffè si scelga, basta chiedere al personale che è altamente competente. Vi consiglieranno la migliore miscela per la vostra bevanda, rispettando anche i vostri gusti personali. Poi macineranno la quantità esatta di chicchi di cui hanno bisogno per il vostro caffè, e in pochi minuti sarà pronto per essere gustato.

Consiglio la miscela della casa se vi piace un gusto morbido e dolce che ricorda le mandorle e il cioccolato, ma, se volete provare qualcosa di più corposo e con media acidità, allora chiedete la miscela brasiliana Fazenda da Lagoa, che è ideale per l’espresso.

Monmouth, 27 Monmouth Street Covent Garden Londra WC2H 9EU.

 

Spero che vi piacciano questi caffè tanto quanto piacciono a me, non solo per i loro ingredienti di alta qualità, ma anche per il personale esperto che è disposto ad aiutare i clienti e condividere la cultura del buon caffè. E no, non sbaglieranno a scrivere il vostro nome sulla cup di carta, che per me è molto molto positivo.

May favourites: 5 Italian food idioms that will make you smile

It’s over, my long months spent at home in Italy are coming to an end, and I will be finally moving back to London in a couple of weeks, with mixed feelings and few quids in my pocket. Right now I have too many worries that won’t leave me alone and, consequently, I rapidly find myself stuck on ideas about what to write about. I tried everything, but I still haven’t found a method to overcome creative block, because apparently nothing seems to turn my brain off, the real culprit of the self censorship I apply on my “stream of consciousness”.

While thinking about not to think I accidentally dropped a bottle of water and my mom sarcastically told me: “your hands are made of ricotta”. I laughed first, but then I thought it would be interesting to share with non-Italian speakers my favourite Italian idioms about food. Oh and by the way, hands made of ricotta is the equivalent in English of being a butterfingers.

  • “Friggere con l’acqua”, literally “frying with water”, means trying to achieve something without the necessary economic means, being stingy but still attempting at doing something that would require money. It often happened to me to be invited to dinner and compliment the host on their food and hear: “Well, thanks, we do not fry with water”, meaning they prepared everything without cutting corners.
  • “Essere come il prezzemolo”, literally “to be like parsley”, meaning to be everywhere considering that parsley is the most used herb in the kitchen. Lately this expression is often referred to “celebrities” or even better to people from reality shows who don’t have any particular skills but are constantly on television, newspapers and/or the internet.
  • “Preso con le mani nella marmellata”, literally “to be caught with the hands in the marmalade jar”, meaning to be caught doing something wrong or forbidden. This expression originated from the love that kids have for sweet food and when, back in the day, they didn’t have nutella or oreos, they used to snack on bread with marmalade, but not too much. So they were tempted to steal the marmalade and often caught with their hands in the jar, doing exactly what they were forbidden to do.
  • “Cercare il pelo nell’uovo”, literally “to look for a piece of hair inside an egg”, meaning to be a fussy, meticulous person who always looks for imperfections in every single situation. The expression comes from the impossibility of finding a piece of hair inside an egg.
  • “Gallina vecchia fa buon brodo”, literally “the old hen makes a good broth”. This idiom refers to a woman who is no longer young but has acquired wisdom over the years. Something tells that I’ll use this for myself in the future, distant distant distant future.

These are my 5 favourite Italian idioms about food, but there are many more as in any other culture, which I’m curious to know, so please leave me a comment to quench my thirst for knowledge.

Hope to get rid of creative block as soon as I can.

 

And now in Italian.

E’ quasi finita, i miei lunghi mesi passati a casa in Italia stanno arrivando al termine visto che fra qualche settimana mi trasferirò di nuovo a Londra con sentimenti contrastanti e poche sterline in tasca. In questo momento ho troppi pensieri che non mi lasciano in pace e, di conseguenza, mi ritrovo senza idee su cosa scrivere. Ho provato di tutto, ma non ho ancora trovato un metodo per superare questo blocco, perché a quanto pare nulla sembra riuscire ad azzittire il mio cervello, che poi è il vero e unico colpevole della censura che ferma il mio ” flusso di coscienza”.

Mentre pensavo a come smettere di pensare, mi è caduta una bottiglia d’acqua dalle mani e mia mamma mi ha subito detto: “hai le mani di ricotta“. A parte la risata iniziale, ho pensato che sarebbe stato interessante condividere con i lettori non italiani i miei 5 modi dire preferiti riguardo il cibo.

  • Friggere con l’ acqua: significa cercare di ottenere un risultato pur non avendo i mezzi economici necessari. Spesso mi è successo di essere invitata a cena e di complimentarmi con i padroni di casa per la bontà delle portate preparate. Quasi sempre mi è stato risposto: “Grazie, mica friggiamo con l’acqua”, cioè tutto è stato preparato come si deve.
  • Essere come il prezzemolo, cioè essere ovunque visto che il prezzemolo è l’erba aromatica più utilizzata in cucina. Ultimamente questa espressione è spesso usata per descrivere varie “celebrità” o meglio (peggio?) ancora partecipanti di vari reality show che non hanno alcuna abilità particolare, ma sono costantemente in televisione, sui giornali e / o su Internet .
  • Essere presi con le mani nella marmellata, nel senso di essere sorpresi a fare qualcosa di sbagliato o vietato. Questa espressione è nata dall’amore che i bambini hanno per i dolci e quando non c’erano le merendine, l’unico dolce che ci si poteva concedere era pane e marmellata, ma ovviamente non troppo. Quindi la tentazione più grande era quella di rubare la marmellata ma spesso si veniva colti sul fatto.
  • Cercare il pelo nell’uovo, descrive una persona meticolosa ed esigente che cerca sempre di imperfezioni in ogni situazione. L’espressione deriva dall’impossibilità di trovare un pelo nell’uovo, visto che niente potrebbe penetrare il suo guscio.
  • Gallina vecchia fa buon brodo. Questa espressione si riferisce a una donna che non è più giovane, ma ha acquisito esperienza e saggezza nel corso degli anni. Qualcosa dice che userò questo modo di dire in un lontano, lontano, lontano futuro.

Questi sono i miei cinque modi di dire preferiti sul cibo, ma ce ne sono molti di più sia in nella cultura italiana, sia nelle altre. Se ne conoscete qualcuno, lasciatemi un commento.
Spero davvero di sbloccare le mie idee prima possibile.

Sunday pastries, an Italian classic

IMG_0546

Memories come back unannounced, unexpectedly, leaving us amazed at how daily routine distracts us.

I was in Norwich, packing my suitcase to fly back home in Italy the next day, but I desperately needed a padlock, because some nice guy at Rome airport cut the one I had, apparently to do some security checks. Just to clarify, I wasn’t smuggling anything else than Parmigiano.

So while I was looking for a suitable padlock at the hardware store, I started talking to the owner who was happy to help someone who – you could definitely tell – was not in her usual context. He asked me where I was going to and as soon as I said I was going back home in Italy, he said: “Well then bring me back some Sunday pastries, that’s how they’re called, right?” Sunday pastries? Bam! epiphany! and I’m back to my childhood again.

Sunday pastries are all those desserts, namely pastries or monoportion cakes that are covered and/or filled with cream, custard or fruit just to name a few. These pastries are usually eaten after the Sunday lunch with the entire family and represent a childhood memory common to many Italians. Well, at least until metabolism or diabetes strikes.

I remember I couldn’t wait for the priest to pronounce the end of the Mass, so we could go straightaway to our most trusted Pasticceria (patisserie) where the ritual could get started and my senses awaken. First, as I opened the door I could smell the reassuring fragrance of sugar and vanilla, a promise of what was going to happen next. Then I used to spend a couple of minutes staring at all the types of pastries because I was fascinated by their shapes and their bright colours, as I couldn’t believe they were handmade only using simple ingredients. I didn’t give much thought at this at the time, but maybe that’s how my passion for baking started.

My mother knew I loved that moment, so she allowed me to chose and indicate to the nice lady what pastries we wanted to end the meal with: cannolo for me, millefeuille for my father, my mother’s favourite sfogliatella (shell shaped pastries filled with sweetened ricotta) and a fruit tart for Nonna.

IMG_0540

Without any doubt, every child like myself waited patiently the end of the lunch, to finally tear up the wrapping paper around the cardboard tray and then resume the ritual of the senses that was suspended in Pasticceria. I used to take my cannolo and then enjoy the sound of puff pastry cracking under the fork and followed by the eruption of sweetened ricotta. The actual taste of the pastry was of course excellent, but it was the whole experience that made it special.

Unfortunately, growing up and leaving home changes the daily life, so moments become memories buried in some hidden angle of our minds until someone or something makes us remember. There we are, again, older and nostalgic but with our bellies always full.

Enjoy your Sunday.

And now in Italian.

I ricordi tornano senza preavviso, inaspettatamente, e ci lasciano stupiti di quanto siamo distratti dalla routine della vita quotidiana.

Mi ricordo che ero a Norwich e stavo preparando la valigia per tornare a casa in Italia il giorno dopo. Avevo un disperato bisogno di un lucchetto, perché prima del viaggio di andata, qualche addetto alla sicurezza dell’aeroporto di Roma ha tranciato quello che avevo, apparentemente per fare alcuni controlli di sicurezza. C’è da dire, però, che non stavo contrabbando altro che del Parmigiano.

Così, mentre cercavo un lucchetto adatto alla mia valigia, ho iniziato a parlare con il proprietario della ferramenta, che era felice di darmi una mano, anche perché si vedeva che ero come un pesce fuor d’acqua. Mi ha chiesto dove stessi andando e appena gli ho risposto che sarei andata a casa in Italia, mi ha subito risposto: “Beh, allora quando torni portami le paste della domenica. Si chiamano così, giusto?” Paste della domenica? Bam! che ricordo! ed eccomi di nuovo bambina.

Non vedevo l’ora che il prete pronunciasse: “La messa è finita, andate in pace.”,per andare subito alla nostra pasticceria di fiducia, così che il rituale potesse iniziare e coinvolgere tutti i sensi. Per prima cosa, una volta aperta la porta della pasticceria già il solo profumo rassicurante di zucchero e vaniglia mi rendeva felice, perché era una promessa di ciò che stava per accadere. Poi stavo lì un paio di minuti, a fissare tutti i tipi di paste, perché ero affascinata dalle loro forme i loro colori vivaci. Non potevo credere che fossero fatte a mano utilizzando pochi semplici ingredienti. Non ci ho dato molto peso a quel tempo, ma forse è così che è nata la mia passione per la pasticceria.

Mia madre sapeva che amavo quel momento, così lei mi faceva scegliere e indicare alla simpatica pasticciera quali fossero le paste che volevo consumare con la mia famiglia: un cannolo per me, la diplomatica per mio padre, la sfogliatella per mamma, e una crostatina con crema e frutta per Nonna.

Senza alcun dubbio, ogni bambino come me attendeva pazientemente la fine del pranzo, per strappare finalmente la carta che avvolgeva il vassoio, e quindi per riprendere il rituale dei sensi che era stato sospeso dal pasto domenicale. Ricordo che prendevo il mio cannolo e mi godevo il suono della sfoglia croccante a contatto con la forchetta, seguito da un’eruzione di ricotta zuccherata. Il sapore vero e proprio della pasta era ovviamente eccellente, ma era tutta l’esperienza che rendeva speciale il momento.

Purtroppo, crescere e andare via di casa cambia la vita quotidiana, così i momenti preziosi diventano ricordi sepolti in qualche angolo nascosto della nostra mente, fino a quando qualcuno o qualcosa ci fa ricordare. E all’improvviso torniamo indietro nel tempo, ma più vecchi, più nostalgici e con la pancia sempre piena.
Buona Domenica.

Monthly list: 5 kitchen utensils I can’t live without

It’s been almost 10 years since I left my parents’ house to study and live in Rome and in this long period I lost the count of all the places I relocated to. Stressful, I know. Every time there’s infinite list of items to pack and ship because, let’s face it, I have some weird emotional attachment to some objects and I’m not the type who likes to buy the same stuff over and over, and then throw them away. I actually prefer to splurge in order to foster my pathological addiction for travels and dinners out. I need help, I’m aware of it.

However, in the jungle of lists of items that must be in my new house, here is the top five kitchen utensils I could never live without them.

  • Wooden spoon – This is my saving grace. I can’t even think of cooking without it. There’s always the normal spoon, or a fork, you would argue, but seriously, the sound of stainless steel cutlery scratching the bottom of the pan, sends shivers down to my spine. Not to mention it’s likely to ruin the pan if this is non-stick.
  • Kitchen knife – We are talking about basics, right?
  • Cutting board – Same here. Plus, you don’t want to ruin your kitchen countertop. Especially if you paid a security deposit to the owner of the house.
  • Colander – First of all, I need it for pasta, but practically I do everything with it: wash vegetables and fruit; leave my food to slowly defrost in there; drain water in veggies (boiled spinach or cucumber, courgettes, aubergine covered in salt); use it as a bowl to momentarily set aside non-liquid food.
  • Ginger/garlic grater – ok ok, I know, this is not a common item at all, but after I bought this in Japan, I seriously wondered how I grated my garlic before. I have to admit that since I had this handy tool, I definitely use more garlic in my dishes. Maybe that’s why people keep avoiding me?

In the next few months I’ll be moving again, and this is the only list of essential objects I wrote so far. You can call me lazy, but at least I know my priorities and, for sure, I’m not going to starve because I can cook as soon as I move to the new place, thanks to my essential kitchen utensils! I’m a person who’s happy with simple things afterall.

Disclaimer: All images are copyrighted by their respective owners unless otherwise stated. Links/Credits are provided via click-through link or caption.  Clicking the link of the image will lead you to its source.

And now in Italian.

Sono passati quasi 10 anni da quando ho lasciato la casa dei miei genitori per andare a studiare e vivere a Roma e in questo lungo periodo ho perso il conto di tutti i traslochi e le città in cui mi sono trasferita. Ogni volta è sempre più stressante. Ogni volta che ci sono liste infinite di cose da imballare e spedire perché, diciamocelo, ho qualche strano attaccamento emotivo ad alcuni oggetti e poi, non sono il tipo che ama comprare le stesse cose più e più volte e poi abbandonarle ogni volta che mi sposto. In realtà preferisco scialacquare i miei pochi, miseri euro nella mia patologica passione per viaggi e cene fuori. Ho bisogno di aiuto, ne sono consapevole.

Comunque, nella giungla di liste di oggetti che devono per forza essere nella mia nuova casa, ecco i cinque utensili da cucina di cui non potrei mai fare a meno.

  • Cucchiaio di legno – la mia salvezza. Non posso nemmeno pensare di cucinare senza. C’è sempre il cucchiaio normale, o una forchetta, si potrebbe obiettare, ma seriamente, il suono delle posate che graffiano il fondo della padella mi fa venire i brividi alla schiena anche solo a pensarci. Per non parlare del fatto che è quasi sicuro che la padella si rovini se è antiaderente.
  • Coltello da cucina – stiamo parlando di strumenti essenziali, giusto ?
  • Tagliere – stessa cosa, non vorrete mica rovinare il piano della cucina? Soprattutto se avete pagato un deposito cauzionale al proprietario di casa.
  • Scolapasta – prima di tutto è necessario per scolare la pasta, ma praticamente lo uso per tutto: lavare verdura e frutta; lasciare il cibo a scongelare lentamente; drenare l’acqua nelle verdure (  tipo spinaci bolliti o cetrioli, zucchine, melanzane da spurgare); o semplicemente usarlo come una ciotola in mancanza d’altro.
  • Grattugia aglio/ zenzero – ok ok, lo so, questo non è un oggetto comune, ma dopo averlo comprato in Giappone, mi sono seriamente chiesta come avessi grattugiato l’aglio in tutti questi anni. Devo ammettere che da quando ho il mio grattugia aglio giapponese uso molto più l’aglio nei miei piatti. Forse è per questo che la gente mi evita?

Nei prossimi mesi mi trasferirò di nuovo, e questa è l’unica lista di oggetti che porterò sicuramente con me. Potete anche dire che sono pigra, ma almeno so che non morirò di fame perché posso cucinare subito, lo stesso giorno del trasloco, grazie ai miei indispensabili utensili da cucina! Dopotutto, sono una persona che diventa felice con poco.

Disclaimer: tutte le foto sono protette da copyright e restano di proprietà dei loro autori. Cliccando sulla foto si potrà accedere direttamente alla sua fonte.