February’s favourites: 5 Ramen bars in London I love

It’s been a while since I thought about writing a post about the best ramen bars in London and whoever read my post in the previous months, knows how I was dedicated at finding the best place in town that could satisfy my ramen craving here in this cold part of Europe.

Aware of the fact that London is full Japanese restaurants and the ramen fashion is rapidly picking up, I decided to visit the most popular ramen bars in town. After careful consideration (as those many rejection email I’m receiving start) I decided to briefly describe my personal favourite places, ranking them for a precise feature that makes their product stand out.

For first starters: Shoryu Ramen. This is the first place where I had the chance to eat ramen in London after my sublime foodie experience in Japan. The Origin Tonkotsu has a pretty well balanced harmony of flavour between the the broth and the toppings. A nice place to start your ramen appreciation. Unfortunately I don’t have a review for Shoryu, because I went there before I started this blog. However I still remember a pleasant experience.

For broth: Ippudo. A bowl of ramen without the perfect broth would just be pointless (see instant ramen cups) Here the broth is creamy and milky as it’s supposed to be after pork bones are violently boiled for 20 hours and release their collagen. Taste is meaty, satisfying, but at the same time it’s almost sweet,  “clean” I would define it, meaning it does not leave a strong greasy aftertaste in your mouth. Read my complete review here.

Ippudo

Shiromaru Hakata Classic @Ippudo

For noodles: Tonkotsu. These guys make their noodles on the premises thanks to their Japanese noodle machine and the use of local ingredients (let’s not forget the research for the perfect alkaline salted water) that perfectly abide by the original recipe. I love their tsukemen noodle so much for their “bite”. Unfortunately they are available only at their Tonkotsu East location. Read my complete review here.

Detail of the noodles.

Noodles for Tsukemen @ Tonkotsu East

For the marinated soft boiled egg: Kanada-ya. Ok, I know, you think I am kidding right? Simply, I’m not. Everybody who had the chance to try a real bowl of ramen (no, the instant one you had in college don’t count) know how extremely important the egg is to the whole flavour of the recipe. It has to be still runny, so the yolk mixes a bit with the soup, and white should have nicely absorbed the soy sauce overnight or more. In other words it should be a concentrate of Umami. Kanada-ya’s egg was absolute perfection, but unfortunately it comes with an additional price of £2. This is not a deterrent to hungry customers, because it seems to sell out very quickly. Read my complete review here.

image6

Kanada ya. That egg over there is to die for.

For strong flavours: Bone Daddies. Considering that when on a diet, ramen in general might not be the best choice for your calorie count, Bone Daddies’ speciality requires customers who want enjoy the full flavour experience and preferably without any sense of guilt after eating. Rich (or fatty maybe?) and intense broth, contrasting aromas and different textures in just one dish. Read my complete review here.

IMG_1795

@Bone Daddies

The winner or should I say winners

I think it depends on the occasion and the the atmosphere I’d like to give to my meal. In fact I would definitely choose Ippudo for a girls’ night out both because the place looks a bit fancier than the other ramen bars and because the broth base has an authentic flavour, but at the same time it tastes clean, not greasy at all.

However if I wanted a foodie date without frills or a highly satisfying solo lunch experience I would definitely choose Bone Daddies’ insanely rich Tonkotsu ramen.
What about you guys, have you visited any of these five places?

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November’s favourites: 5 sweet treats to enjoy in London

Here we go again, Monday. A gloomy cold Monday here in London, like Monday itself wasn’t enough to get bogged down as soon as I open my eyes. So what’s the best medicine to increase our serotonin levels, therefore have a moment of happiness? Chocolate. Or cake. Or just whatever you fancy as guilty pleasure.

Here 5 guilty pleasures I indulged in this November:

image6

Couldn’t resist…

Hot Chocolate and Curly Whirly Brownie from Konditor and Cook. First things first, I confess to be a bit fussy for hot chocolate, because too many times I have been given some cheap and bitter stuff that always made wonder about how managers care about the quality of a product and the satisfaction of customers. This little introduction just state how much I actually appreciated Konditor and Cook’s product: one sip of this luscious hot chocolate and you can taste the top quality of a rich bittersweet cocoa at the right temperature, thanks to the amazing barista staff. Then the Curly Whirly brownie, the most popular treat at Konditor and Cook: a dense chocolate chip goodness swirled with vanilla cheesecake, because we don’t want to choose, we want it all! After the first bite I understand why it’s the most famous choice: so fudgy and moist that it melts in my mouth. A silky texture balanced by crunchy chocolate chips and creamy cheesecake. These three types of texture also reflect a harmony of flavours: sweet and bitter married together by the delicate vanilla aroma of cheesecake.

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Couldn’t resist, again.

Baked Zebra Crodoughnuts from Dum Dum Donutterie. The founder and doughnut chef Paul Hurley opened Dum Dum with the mission of bringing on the market a baked doughnut which should have been as good as the fried one, or even better. Well, he’s having quite a success and I am one of Dum Dum’s loyal customers, especially after trying the Zebra crodoughnut. Layers of ring-shaped croissant dough filled with chocolate butter crème form another one of my favourite guilty pleasures of the month. This is the one I end up buying often, because chocolate, that’s why! Anyway, I also recommend the Strawberries & Cream and the Peter Andre Yum Yum Dum Dum, which despite the funny name is filled with dulce de leche crème. Or if you are a Nutella fan get the Chocolate and Hazelnut one (in the picture below).

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Black Bottom Cupcake from Hummingbird bakery. A classic one for me, because it’s been 4 years after my first and I always go back and have one. Moist and dense chocolate sponge with cheesecake and chocolate chips filling and cream cheese frosting (see a recurring pattern here?). A bomb, of calories and happiness.

Chocolate and banana streusel cake from Timber Yard café. I first tried this cake only a couple of days ago, but it is so good that I feel I need to share it with you guys – unfortunately only  by describing it. The perfect combination of spongy and crunchy textures with different levels of sweetness, from the streusel topping to the banana’s natural sugar and the bitterness of chocolate.

Matcha green tea dorayaki from Japan Centre. if you feel the options above are too much to handle and prefer a guilty pleasure that doesn’t include chocolate, why not getting a matcha green tea custard dorayaki from Japan Centre. Two featherlight soft pancakes that sandwich a delicate matcha custard filling. The overall taste is sweet but with a bitter note given by green tea. A satisfying treat for sure.

What about you guys, what are your guilty pleasures of the moment?

Have a good week!

P.S.: regarding my suspects of gluten intolerance I addressed in this post, I am still waiting to run the test, and in order not have a false positive result, I’m still eating foods that contain gluten (as for example the cakes listed in this article ). Will see how it goes.

October’s Favourites: 5 gluten free products I’m loving!

Thanks to my faithful hypocondria I just discovered that some mild symptoms I have from birth could be linked to a hypothetical coeliac disease or gluten intolerance. Panic at first, that’s what being ignorant about the subject causes. However, my doctor reassured me that if this were the case, it wouldn’t be the end of the world, since valid gluten free alternatives on the market are rapidly increasing.

At the moment I am waiting to go back to Italy to run some tests and verify if a coeliac disease or gluten free intolerance is confirmed, but in the meantime I was advised to reduce the intake of gluten rich foods and see how it goes.

So lately, I often find myself hanging out at Whole Foods, to carefully study the alternatives I should adopt in case I get diagnosed. I still need to do a lot of research about the topic, but, for the moment, these are my 5 gluten free products that I’m loving this month:

Drink me chai green tea chai latte

 

Normally I’m not really a fan of Chai Latte, because I find the spice blend too powerful for me, but this one is truly amazing! It’s spicy but delicate and sweet with a pinch of green tea to balance the overall flavour.

Seasoned nori seaweed – Crispy texture, full of flavour and fun to snack on. Be careful to read the label though, as the majority of Japanese brands use wheat and soy sauce (which contains wheat unless it’s tamari) in their seasoning. In fact, I was about to give up when, luckily, I found some Korean seaweed that was seasoned with just olive oil and sea salt.  Although seasoned nori seaweed is super easy to prepare at home, it’s handier for the lazy ones like me, to have a little package to toss in the bag, right? Healthy bits: nori seaweed is also good for your body because it is a natural source of iodine, which regulates the production thyroid hormones.

Nutritional yeast:

Nothing to be scared or disgusted about, because nutritional yeast is inactive, or in other words dead! It’s grown on sugar canes or molasses then killed with heat. In this phase the yeast develops glutamic acid, which is a natural source of umami. This is one of the two main reasons why nutritional yeast is produced and sold, because it adds a nutty savoury note to our recipes and enhances their flavour. Nutritional yeast does not only please the palate, but it also has healthy benefits, because it is packed with vitamin B complex, zinc, selenium, folic acid, potassium and proteins. Cool right? At the moment I’m using nutritional yeast in soups, salads and mashed potatoes, but I will experiment more combinations.

Want to know more about nutritional yeast? then check this blog out.

 

Eat natural bars:

My guilty pleasure in this period I’m trying to figure out if I have a gluten intolerance or not. Well, to be honest I loved these bars even before, but let’s say that now I have a good excuse to try the whole range. My favourite ones are the cashew&blueberry bar with yogurt coating and the coffee&chocolate bar with peanuts and almonds.

Mangajo lemon and green tea drink:

Last, but not the least a light and refreshing drink made with lemon, apple juice and a hint of green tea. The only sugar in this drink is the natural fructose contained in both lemons and apples. Great for those who don’t like super sweet beverages or watch calories. Normally, fruit juices should be gluten free in the first place but it’s always better to check the label regarding any possibility of contamination by the handling of other sources.

What about you guys? Let me know what you’re loving this month, both regular and gluten free snacks. Recipes for homemade treats are also welcome, as I would like to have everything covered in case this coeliac disease/gluten intolerance is confirmed. This would be the second phase, the acceptance, but we all know that before there’s the denial. Considering my optimism, I already picture myself crying my eyes out for the possibility of giving up the regular pizza for ever. Sigh!

September favourites: 5 not conventional snacks that I am loving

The area of London I recently moved in is definitely a trendy one, full of hipsters and hipster wannabes. Therefore due to the high level of “hipster population”, shops are now more than eager to stick to the eco-friendly credo following the latest trends in terms of local, organic, free range, home grown food just to name few adjectives that cover shop signs and windows.

I cannot deny my grocery shopping is influenced as well, mainly because I was raised this way (click here) Not to mention how changing eating habits affected my everyday life when I moved from Italy to London 5 years ago. In other words I got 7 kilos and, as you can easily imagine, I wasn’t the happiest girl on earth.

With that in mind, I always try to balance my weekly meals according to the percentage of carbs, proteins and fibers. Then, systematically something messes up my plans and I find myself eating nutella from the jar or devouring a whole bag of crisps, or chips for you guys across the pond. What is the best thing to do when those cravings beg you to give up your good intentions for 5 seconds of pure ephemeral joy? Well, I like to think I try to limit the damages by choosing those unconventional snacks that you can find at Whole Foods or the Asian Markets, but probably I am just fooling myself. Here you can find my favourites of the month:

  • Calbee Shrimp Chips: The first time I tried these “crisps” was at the Daiso 100 yen shop in Harajuku, Tokyo. I was surprised that as much as a processed food we are talking about, the ingredient list is short and they were relatively low in sodium. Also the taste is delicate while, as you can imagine, their smell is strong. Ingredients: Wheat, Flour, Canola oil, Modified food starch, Shrimp, Sugar, Salt, Baking powder, MSG. Calories:  130 per serving (28 grams) or 464 per 100 grams.

  • Calbee Snapea Crisps: I first got to know these crisps while browsing on youtube, in some healthy grocery haul video, so last week I found them on offer at Wholefoods and I gave them a chance. A huge commitment for someone who doesn’t like peas like me. There are 3 types for the English market: lightly salted, Ceasar (salad seasoning?) and Tomato and basil. I picked the lightly salted ones because their ingredient list was way shorter than the other two. Long story short: I liked them because they are salty on the outside and sweet-ish on the inside. Ingredients: Green Peas, Vegetable Oil (Canola, Sunflower and/or Safflower Oil), Rice, Salt, Calcium Carbonate And Vitamin C (Ascorbyl Palmitate) Calories: 110 per serving or 393 per 100 grams.

  • Cofresh Hummus Chips: or simply chickpea crisps as there’s no trace of tahini or sesame. It’s a bit misleading as a product, but even though these chips do not really taste like hummus, they’re not as bland as the ingredient list would suggest. Ingredients: Chickpea Flour, Rice, Potato Starch, Vegetable Oil (Rapeseed), Corn Flour, Sea Salt. Calories: 135 per serving or 483 per 100 grams.

  • Senbei or Japanese Rice crackers: I don’t really stick to a brand in particular, but to a flavour, in fact I tend to prefer those seasoned with soy sauce. I believe rice flour is lighter and easier to digest than wheat, but feel free to correct me if I’m saying something not really correct However, the real reason I tend to buy senbei is that they are often packed in pairs, which is definitely not fair to the environment but prevents me to eat more than one packet because I feel guilty. Calories are an average of 35 per cracker.

  • Wasabi peas: namely roasted peas covered in wasabi. This is a tricky one, because it’s one of those snacks that I don’t really like at first, but then I have to finish the whole packet because of a strange addiction. Calories are around 400 per 100 gr.

…or you could eat that apple you have on your kitchen counter!

Have you guys tried these snacks? let me know what you think about them and please suggest me what I should try after these, hoping to find them in London.


And now in Italian.

L’area di Londra in cui mi sono trasferita recentemente è sicuramente quella più di tendenza, piena di hipsters e aspiranti tali. Per questo, a causa dell’elevato presenza di questa fetta di popolazione, i proprietari dei negozi sono molto inclini a seguire il credo eco friendly degli hipster, e quindi le ultime tendenze in termini di cibi locali, biologici, da allevamenti a terra, o fatti in casa, solo per citare alcuni descrizioni che caratterizzano le insegne e le vetrine del quartiere.

Non posso negare una certa influenza “verde” su ciò che compro, ma solo perché sono stato cresciuta in questo modo (cliccate qui) per non parlare di quanto aver cambiato le mie abitudini alimentari da un paese all’altro abbia pesato sulla la mia vita di tutti i giorni. In altre parole, 5 anni fa avevo preso 7 chili e, come si può facilmente immaginare, non ero molto contenta della cosa.

Tenendo a mente tutto ciò, cerco sempre di bilanciare i miei pasti settimanali a seconda della percentuale di carboidrati, proteine ​​e fibre. Poi, sistematicamente c’è sempre qualcosa che incasina i miei piani e mi ritrovo a mangiare nutella dal barattolo o a finire un intero sacchetto di patatine. Qual è la cosa migliore da fare quando ti prendono quelle voglie che ti istigano ad abbandonare le buone intenzioni per 5 secondi di fugace piacere? Beh, mi piace pensare che cerco di limitare i danni scegliendo quegli snack inusuali che si possono trovare nei negozi di cibi biologici o in quelli asiatici, ma probabilmente (anzi, quasi sicuramente) mi prendo in giro da sola. Qui potete trovare i miei preferiti del mese:

  • Patatine Calbee ai gamberi: La prima volta che ho provato queste “patatine” era al negozio Daiso ¥ 100 a Harajuku, Tokyo. Ricordo che rimasi sorpresa che per quanto fosse un alimento industriale, la lista degli ingredienti era breve e con basso contenuto di sodio. Il gusto è delicato, mentre, come si può immaginare, il loro odore è forte a causa del condimento al sapore di gambero. Ingredienti: frumento, farina, olio di colza, amido alimentare modificato, gamberetti, zucchero, sale, lievito, glutammato. Calorie: 130 per porzione (28 gr.) o 464 per 100 gr.
  • Patatine Calbee Snapea ai piselli: ho avuto modo di conoscere queste patatine mentre navigavo su youtube, in alcuni video riguardanti gli snack salutari, così la settimana scorsa le ho trovate in offerta da Wholefoods e ho dato loro una possibilità. Un fatto significativo per chi, come me, non ama i piselli. Ci sono 3 tipi di prodotto per il mercato inglese: leggermente salate, Ceasar (condimento per l’insalata?) e pomodoro e basilico. Ho scelto le prime perché la loro lista degli ingredienti era molto più breve rispetto agli altri due. Per farla breve: mi sono piaciute perché sono salate all’esterno e dolciastre all’interno. Ingredienti: piselli, olio vegetale (colza, girasole e / o olio di cartamo), riso, sale, carbonato di calcio e vitamina C (ascorbil palmitato). Calorie: 110 per porzione o 393 per 100 gr.
  • Cofresh Hummus Chips: o semplicemente patatine di ceci visto che non c’è traccia di tahini o di sesamo. E ‘un po’ fuorviante come prodotto, ma anche se non sa di hummus, queste patatine non hanno un gusto così piatto come la lista degli ingredienti suggerirebbe. Ingredienti: ceci farina, riso, fecola di patate, olio vegetale (colza), farina di mais, sale marino. Calorie: 135 cal per porzione o per 483 100 gr.
  • Senbei o crackers di riso giapponesi: Non c’è una marca in particolare a cui sono legata, ma il gusto sì, infatti tendo a preferire quelli alla salsa di soia. Credo che la farina di riso sia più leggera e più facile da digerire rispetto al frumento, ma correggetemi se sto dicendo una castroneria. Comunque, il vero motivo per cui compro i senbei è che sono spesso confezionati in coppia, cosa che è sicuramente non è eco friendly, ma mi impedisce di mangiarne più di un pacchetto, perché mi sentirei in colpa. Le calorie sono una media di 35 per cracker.
  • Piselli al Wasabi: cioè piselli tostati e ricoperti di wasabi. Questo è uno snack strano, perché è sempre così, in un primo momento non mi piace, ma poi, piano piano, sviluppa una strana dipendenza che mi obbliga a finire l’intero pacchetto. Le calorie sono circa 400 per 100 gr.

… potreste sempre mangiare quella mela che avete nella fruttiera in cucina, o no?

E voi, avete mai provato questi snack? fatemi sapere cosa ne pensate e suggeritemene altri, sperando che li possa trovare qui a Londra.

Monthly list: 5 kitchen utensils I can’t live without

It’s been almost 10 years since I left my parents’ house to study and live in Rome and in this long period I lost the count of all the places I relocated to. Stressful, I know. Every time there’s infinite list of items to pack and ship because, let’s face it, I have some weird emotional attachment to some objects and I’m not the type who likes to buy the same stuff over and over, and then throw them away. I actually prefer to splurge in order to foster my pathological addiction for travels and dinners out. I need help, I’m aware of it.

However, in the jungle of lists of items that must be in my new house, here is the top five kitchen utensils I could never live without them.

  • Wooden spoon – This is my saving grace. I can’t even think of cooking without it. There’s always the normal spoon, or a fork, you would argue, but seriously, the sound of stainless steel cutlery scratching the bottom of the pan, sends shivers down to my spine. Not to mention it’s likely to ruin the pan if this is non-stick.
  • Kitchen knife – We are talking about basics, right?
  • Cutting board – Same here. Plus, you don’t want to ruin your kitchen countertop. Especially if you paid a security deposit to the owner of the house.
  • Colander – First of all, I need it for pasta, but practically I do everything with it: wash vegetables and fruit; leave my food to slowly defrost in there; drain water in veggies (boiled spinach or cucumber, courgettes, aubergine covered in salt); use it as a bowl to momentarily set aside non-liquid food.
  • Ginger/garlic grater – ok ok, I know, this is not a common item at all, but after I bought this in Japan, I seriously wondered how I grated my garlic before. I have to admit that since I had this handy tool, I definitely use more garlic in my dishes. Maybe that’s why people keep avoiding me?

In the next few months I’ll be moving again, and this is the only list of essential objects I wrote so far. You can call me lazy, but at least I know my priorities and, for sure, I’m not going to starve because I can cook as soon as I move to the new place, thanks to my essential kitchen utensils! I’m a person who’s happy with simple things afterall.

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And now in Italian.

Sono passati quasi 10 anni da quando ho lasciato la casa dei miei genitori per andare a studiare e vivere a Roma e in questo lungo periodo ho perso il conto di tutti i traslochi e le città in cui mi sono trasferita. Ogni volta è sempre più stressante. Ogni volta che ci sono liste infinite di cose da imballare e spedire perché, diciamocelo, ho qualche strano attaccamento emotivo ad alcuni oggetti e poi, non sono il tipo che ama comprare le stesse cose più e più volte e poi abbandonarle ogni volta che mi sposto. In realtà preferisco scialacquare i miei pochi, miseri euro nella mia patologica passione per viaggi e cene fuori. Ho bisogno di aiuto, ne sono consapevole.

Comunque, nella giungla di liste di oggetti che devono per forza essere nella mia nuova casa, ecco i cinque utensili da cucina di cui non potrei mai fare a meno.

  • Cucchiaio di legno – la mia salvezza. Non posso nemmeno pensare di cucinare senza. C’è sempre il cucchiaio normale, o una forchetta, si potrebbe obiettare, ma seriamente, il suono delle posate che graffiano il fondo della padella mi fa venire i brividi alla schiena anche solo a pensarci. Per non parlare del fatto che è quasi sicuro che la padella si rovini se è antiaderente.
  • Coltello da cucina – stiamo parlando di strumenti essenziali, giusto ?
  • Tagliere – stessa cosa, non vorrete mica rovinare il piano della cucina? Soprattutto se avete pagato un deposito cauzionale al proprietario di casa.
  • Scolapasta – prima di tutto è necessario per scolare la pasta, ma praticamente lo uso per tutto: lavare verdura e frutta; lasciare il cibo a scongelare lentamente; drenare l’acqua nelle verdure (  tipo spinaci bolliti o cetrioli, zucchine, melanzane da spurgare); o semplicemente usarlo come una ciotola in mancanza d’altro.
  • Grattugia aglio/ zenzero – ok ok, lo so, questo non è un oggetto comune, ma dopo averlo comprato in Giappone, mi sono seriamente chiesta come avessi grattugiato l’aglio in tutti questi anni. Devo ammettere che da quando ho il mio grattugia aglio giapponese uso molto più l’aglio nei miei piatti. Forse è per questo che la gente mi evita?

Nei prossimi mesi mi trasferirò di nuovo, e questa è l’unica lista di oggetti che porterò sicuramente con me. Potete anche dire che sono pigra, ma almeno so che non morirò di fame perché posso cucinare subito, lo stesso giorno del trasloco, grazie ai miei indispensabili utensili da cucina! Dopotutto, sono una persona che diventa felice con poco.

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January’s list: the top 5 eating experiences to have at least once

Usually as the new year begins, we make a lot of resolutions that -let’s be honest- we hardly ever respect, but I would lie if I said I didn’t make an evaluation of last year and what I want in the future, not necessarily in 2014. I thought about an uncountable number things, and among the less serious ones there is, of course, eating experiences it would be nice to have in my lifetime.

So, here we are with my January’s top 5, actually in this case a bucket list. Don’t worry, there’s nothing weird, at least I hope.

1. Eating at Jiro’s, the best sushi restaurant in the world. Extremely expensive, I know, but food critics say the experience is worth every single penny. Besides, if Katy Perry dines at Jiro’s, why can’t I? I know, don’t answer.

Photo: @katyperry

Photo: @katyperry

2. Ordering a massive burger and giant milkshake at a vintage American diner. This might not sound special but, as European who hasn’t set a foot in the US yet, I always saw Diners in movies and I kind of want to feel like in a scene of Back to the Future.

3. Trying Pierre Hermé’s desserts as they are often described to have the perfect flavour.

Photo: Yuichi Sakuraba

Photo: Yuichi Sakuraba

4. Eating Magnolia Bakery’s cupcakes.

5. Doing an Italian food tour where I can try a couple of typical recipes for each region.

If my wallet allows me, my resolution for the near future is to travel as much as I can, in order to satisfy all my cravings, knowledge and emotions. Yes, emotions, just like when I was moved to tears after tasting the real sushi at Tsukiji market, or when I was treated to a Michelin starred restaurant for the first time last year. Am I a hopeless romantic? You bet, but let’s not talk about me now, because I’m interested to know the eating experiences you’d love to have in your lifetime. So, please, leave a comment.

Disclaimer: All images are copyrighted by their respective owners unless otherwise stated. Links/Credits are provided via click-through link or caption.  Clicking the link of the image will lead you to its source.

 

And now in Italian.

Di solito, con l’inizio del nuovo anno siamo propensi a fare i così detti “buoni propositi” che, siamo onesti, non rispettiamo quasi mai. Mentirei se dicessi che non ho fatto un bilancio dello scorso anno e di quello che vorrei per il mio futuro, non necessariamente per 2014. Ho perso il conto delle cose a cui ho pensato, ma tra le meno serie ci sono le esperienze culinarie che mi piacerebbe fare almeno una volta nella vita.

Quindi, ecco la mia lista. Non c’è niente di strano, o almeno credo.

  1. Mangiare il miglior sushi del mondo da Jiro, costosissimo, ma i critici dicono che vale ogni centesimo speso. E poi, se ci va Katy Perry, perché non posso andarci io? Ok, lo so il perché.

  2. Ordinare un hamburger e un milkshake giganti, in un diner americano vintage. Lo so, non suona come una cosa particolare, ma per me che non ho mai messo piede negli Stati Uniti, sarebbe come ritrovarsi in un film, come essere in una scena di Ritorno al Futuro.

  3. Assaggiare i dolci di Pierre Hermé, perché si dice che il loro sapore rasenti la perfezione.

  4. Provare le cupcakes di Magnolia Bakery.

  5. Fare un tour delle regioni italiane, assaggiando più di un piatto tipico per ognuna.

Se le mie finanze lo permetteranno, il mio proposito per il futuro è di viaggiare il più possibile, per soddisfare la mia fame di cibo, conoscenza ed emozioni. Sì, emozioni, come quando ho provato il vero sushi al mercato di Tsukiji e mi sono commossa, oppure la prima volta che ho mangiato in un ristorante stellato. Sono un’inguaribile romantica? Ci potete scommettere, ma basta a parlare di me, perché vorrei sapere quali sono le esperienze culinarie che vorreste fare nella vita.

Lasciatemi un commento.

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